Psalm 11 Flight or Faith

Psalm 11 Flight or Faith

Psalm 11 begins with a statement of trust and ends on a promise of love. The counsel to flee has been effectively countered by a “shelter in place” faith. The Lord is in his temple, let the faithful say “Amen.” “Things fall apart” but the Lord is on his throne. The upright in heart are under sniper fire but the Lord has them covered. His devastating counter attack is a firestorm of fiery coals, burning sulfur and a scorching wind. The Lord hates those who love violence and he defends the cause of the righteous. Security, stability, and unshakeable confidence are important, but for the upright in heart there is even more at stake. “God as ‘refuge’ may be sought from motives that are all too self-regarding; but to ‘behold his face’ is a goal in which only love has any interest.”

Psalm 10 Your Will Be Done

Psalm 10  Your Will Be Done  David’s case against the wicked is spurred on by the Lord’s failure to intervene. The psalmist is not naive about the psychology of evil, but he is perplexed by Yahweh’s hiddenness. David paints a picture of raw personal evil.

Christ’s followers are often naive about evil, but the Bible is not. In worship the psalmist profiles the predator and causes us to examine ourselves.

If these sermon length meditations on the psalms are helpful to you, please let me know how I can make them better (dwebster@samford.edu).

 

Psalm 9 – Your Kingdom Come

Psalm 9  Your Kingdom Come   Christians know that no nation can administer justice and rule the world in righteousness. No ruler can destroy the enemy, deliver the oppressed, and attend to the cry of the afflicted. Politics cannot achieve the righteousness longed for by the image-bearers of God. There is a clash of kingdoms between the kingdom of God and the kingdoms of the world. The nations of the world are set in opposition to the Name that is above every name.

Psalm 8 Mere Mortals

Psalm 8  Mere Mortals  At the heart of this hymn of praise is a question: What is man? David asks and answers this question in an unusual way. Instead of lecturing us, he worships God. Before babies are able to pronounce a single word they “speak loudly and distinctly in commendation of God’s liberality towards the human race” (Calvin). The strategic value of the witness of this psalm points forward to the Incarnate One.